Tag Archives: Kant

On Foucault’s Review of Cassirer’s Philosophy of the Enlightenment

It is unfortunate that no one has gotten around to translating Michel Foucault’s 1966 review of the French translation of Ernst Cassirer’s Philosophie der Aufklärung.1 Granted, it is a short text and – prior to its reprinting in Foucault’s Dits … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 12 Comments

Out of Unmündigkeit – Final Thoughts on Translating Kant on Enlightenment

I will take my leave from this series of posts on the translation of the first sentence of Kant’s answer to the question “What is enlightenment?” with a consideration of how translators have handled Ausgang,the word that characterizes the passage … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

“Voluntary Nonage”? — Translating Kant on Enlightenment (Part 4)

Kant’s talents as a writer tend to be greatly underestimated. Granted, the Three Critiques are no walk in the park, but even when Kant’s prose struggles because it is forced to do rather difficult things, there are striking passages (e.g. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 8 Comments

Making Sense of “Aufklärung” – Translating Kant, Part III

I began this series of posts more or less as a lark, thinking that I’d look at how my fellow translators of Kant’s response to the question “What is enlightenment?” handled the opening sentence. But this exercise turned out to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Kant for Kids (Notes on a Survivor)

Tracing the reception of Kant’s phrase “selbstverschudeten Unmündigkeit” (“self-incurred immaturity” is the current consensus on how to translate it), I stumbled on one of those things that reminds us about the books, and the worlds, we have lost: This peculiar … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment

Translating Kant on Enlightenment: Two Nineteenth-Century Translations

As sketched last week, my plan had been to consider nine different translations of Kant’s essay on the question “What is Enlightenment?” and see how the translation of the crucial terms in essay’s opening sentence changed over the last two … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

The Words We Have Lost: Translating Kant on Enlightenment

What might have been the most famous words ever written about the Enlightenment go like this: “Aufklärung ist der Ausgang des Menschen aus seiner selbstverschuldeten Unmündigkeit.”  The problem, however, is that the author of these words — Immanuel Kant (of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment

Isaiah Berlin & Karl Popper on Liberty & Enlightenment (Part II)

Last Sunday (which, for those of us who live in the Boston area, seems like the distant past), I began an examination of Karl Popper’s comments on Isaiah Berlin’s 1958 lecture “Two Concepts of Liberty” in his letter to Berlin … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Karl Popper & Isaiah Berlin on Liberty & Enlightenment (Part I)

On October 31, 1958, Isaiah Berlin assumed the Chichele Chair of Social and Political Theory at Oxford and delivered his inaugural lecture, “Two Concepts of Liberty.” The lecture — which is now regarded as one of the more important contributions … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Sapere Aude: Incipe!

To begin, let’s go back to Kant again. If there’s ever a second edition of What is Enlightenment?: Eighteenth-Century Answers and Twentieth-Century Questions (University of California Press, 1996), I’d like to make two changes in my translation of Kant’s answer … Continue reading

| Tagged , | 11 Comments